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Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography
Posted By : joemuscat | Date : 30 Nov 2021 16:35 | Comments : 0

Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography
Publisher:Da Capo Press | 1985-05 | ISBN:0306802325 | Pages:615 | PDF | 3.2 MB
Ronald Hayman - Fassbinder: Film maker (1984)
Posted By : kharmok | Date : 28 Nov 2021 08:40 | Comments : 3

Ronald Hayman - Fassbinder: Film maker (1984)
Scan | 164 pages | 89 jpgs | 126 Mb | Language: English | ISBN: 029778448X

Probably the best biography of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, mentioned in Wikipedia, Senses of Cinema, etc. with a lot of black and white pictures. An insight into his character and films.
Einstein in His Own Words
Posted By : codenamez | Date : 24 Nov 2021 12:05 | Comments : 1

Anne Rooney, "Einstein in His Own Words"
Gramercy | 192 pages | 2006 | ISBN: 0517228475 | PDF | 31 MB

Einstein In His Own Words collects wisdom and insight straight from the mind of the most famous genius of the 20th century. Read Einstein's thoughts and writings on a variety of subjects, including relativity, black holes, atomic energy, time travel, and more.
Stalin: The First In-depth Biography Based on Explosive New Documents from Russia's Secret Archives
Posted By : jiji_jiji | Date : 17 Nov 2021 20:50 | Comments : 6

Edvard Radzinsky, "Stalin: The First In-depth Biography Based on Explosive New Documents from Russia's Secret Archives"
Publisher: Anchor | ISBN: 0385479549 | 624 pages | PDF | 4.3 MB
The Reader of Gentlemen's Mail: Herbert O. Yardley and the Birth of American Codebreaking
Posted By : anjer | Date : 11 Nov 2021 20:20 | Comments : 1

David Kahn, The Reader of Gentlemen's Mail: Herbert O. Yardley and the Birth of American Codebreaking
Yale University Press | ISBN 0300098464 | 2004 | PDF | 1 MB | 341 pages

Cryptographers and other spies already know and respect the name of Herbert O. Yardley. He isn't well known by others, but almost fifty years after his death, he has gotten a full, instructive biography. Kahn is the perfect teller of this tale, having written both articles for scholarly journals as well as popular books about intelligence matters. There is not a great deal of detail about the procedures of decryption, which are described only generally, but there is a unique American life here. According to Kahn, Yardley better than anyone foresaw how important cracking signals could be to American intelligence. He created the first permanent agency to intercept messages and break them. He was "the most colorful and controversial figure in American intelligence," and his controversial actions are fully included here.

Isaac Newton: And the Scientific Revolution
Posted By : Josaphat | Date : 10 Nov 2021 23:22 | Comments : 3

Gale E. Christianson, "Isaac Newton: And the Scientific Revolution"
Oxford University Press | ISBN: 0195092244 | September 16, 2021 | PDF | 160 pages | 10318 KB

In 1665, when an epidemic of the plague forced Cambridge University to close, Isaac Newton, then a young, undistinguished scholar, returned to his childhood home in rural England. Away from his colleagues and professors, Newton embarked on one of the greatest intellectual odysseys in the history of science: he began to formulate the law of universal gravitation, developed the calculus, and made revolutionary discoveries about the nature of light. After his return to Cambridge, Newton's genius was quickly recognized and his reputation forever established. This biography also allows us to see the personal side of Newton, whose life away from science was equally fascinating. Quarrelsome, quirky, and not above using his position to silence critics and further his own career, he was an authentic genius with all too human faults.
Ignorance, Confidence, and Filthy Rich Friends The Business Adventures of Mark Twain, Chronic Speculator and Entrepreneur
Posted By : tika12 | Date : 10 Nov 2021 06:17 | Comments : 4

Peter Krass, "Ignorance, Confidence, and Filthy Rich Friends The Business Adventures of Mark Twain, Chronic Speculator and Entrepreneur"
Wiley (March 5, 2022) | ISBN:0471933376 | 278 pages | PDF | 1,4 Mb
Vietnam: A Natural History
Posted By : matmochue | Date : 08 Nov 2021 03:28 | Comments : 3
Vietnam

Vietnam: A Natural History
Yale University Press | ISBN:0300106084 | Edition - 2022-06-11 | PDF | 448 pages | 12.84 MB | Rapidshare & Megaupload

A country uncommonly rich in plants, animals, and natural habitats, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam shelters a significant portion of the world’s biological diversity, including rare and unique organisms and an unusual mixture of tropical and temperate species. This book is the first comprehensive account of Vietnam’s natural history in English. Illustrated with maps, photographs, and thirty-five original watercolor illustrations, the book offers a complete tour of the country’s plants and animals along with a full discussion of the factors shaping their evolution and distribution.
The Revenge of Thomas Eakins
Posted By : anjer | Date : 07 Nov 2021 10:54 | Comments : 0

Sidney D. Kirkpatrick, The Revenge of Thomas Eakins
Yale University Press | ISBN 0300108559 | 2006 | PDF | 2 MB | 577 pages

This book recounts the artist’s life in fascinating detail, drawing on a treasure trove of Eakins family correspondence and papers that have only recently been discovered.Never before has Thomas Eakins’s story been told with such drama, clarity, and accuracy. Sidney Kirkpatrick sets the painter’s life and art in the wider context of the changing world he devoted himself to portraying, and he also addresses the artist’s private life—the contradictory impulses, obsessions, and possible psychological illness that fired his work.
The Mind of Gladstone: Religion, Homer, and Politics
Posted By : anjer | Date : 06 Nov 2021 19:24 | Comments : 3

David W. Bebbington, "The Mind of Gladstone: Religion, Homer, and Politics"
Oxford University Press | ISBN 0199267650 | 2004 | PDF | 1 MB | 342 pages

Gladstone's ideas are far more accessible for analysis now that, following the publication of his diaries, a record of his reading is available. This book traces the evolution of what the diaries reveal as the statesman's central intellectual preoccupations, theology and classical scholarship, as well as the groundwork of his early Conservatism and his mature Liberalism.Gladstone was undoubtedly the most deep-thinking and intellectual prime minister Great Britain has ever had.
Pope and the Destiny of the Stuarts: History, Politics, and Mythology in the Age of Queen Anne
Posted By : anjer | Date : 06 Nov 2021 12:13 | Comments : 2

Pat Rogers, Pope and the Destiny of the Stuarts: History, Politics, and Mythology in the Age of Queen Anne
Oxford University Press | ISBN 0199274398 | 2005 | PDF | 2 MB | 360 pages

The book gives a complete account of Pope's life and work in his early twenties, and supplies a new political interpretation, including a careful analysis of possible Jacobite colourings. Attention is directed towards a range of literary, historical, ideological, and artistic issues. The book draws on classical studies (the role of Virgil and Ovid especially), Renaissance scholarship, literary history, political history, and artistic contexts.
Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith
Posted By : Josaphat | Date : 05 Nov 2021 22:54 | Comments : 0

Colin A. Russell, "Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith"
Oxford University Press | ISBN: 0195117638 | November 29, 2021 | PDF | 124 pages | 7.7 MB

Michael Faraday (1791-1867), the son of a blacksmith, described his education as "little more than the rudiments of reading, writing, and arithmetic at a common day-school." Yet from such basics, he became one of the most prolific and wide-ranging experimental scientists who ever lived. As a bookbinder's apprentice with a voracious appetite for learning, he read every book he got his hands on. In 1812 he attended a series of chemistry lectures by Sir Humphry Davy at London's prestigious Royal Institution. He took copious and careful notes, and, in the hopes of landing a scientific job, bound them and sent them to the lecturer. Davy was impressed enough to hire the 21-year-old as a laboratory assistant. In his first decade at the Institution, Faraday discovered benzene, isobutylene, and two chlorides of carbon. But despite these and other accomplishments in chemistry, he is chiefly remembered for his work in physics. In 1831 he proved that magnetism could generate an electric current, thereby establishing the field of electromagnetism and leading to the invention of the dynamo. In addition to his extraordinary scientific activities, Faraday was a leader in his church, whose faith and wish to serve guided him throughout his career. An engaging public speaker, he gave popular lectures on scientific subjects, and helped found a tradition of scientific education for children and laypeople that continues to this day. Oxford Portraits in Science is an ongoing series of scientific biographies for young adults. Written by top scholars and writers, each biography examines the personality of its subject as well as the thought process leading to his or her discoveries. These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.
Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith
Posted By : Josaphat | Date : 05 Nov 2021 22:54 | Comments : 0

Colin A. Russell, "Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith"
Oxford University Press | ISBN: 0195117638 | November 29, 2021 | PDF | 124 pages | 7.7 MB

Michael Faraday (1791-1867), the son of a blacksmith, described his education as "little more than the rudiments of reading, writing, and arithmetic at a common day-school." Yet from such basics, he became one of the most prolific and wide-ranging experimental scientists who ever lived. As a bookbinder's apprentice with a voracious appetite for learning, he read every book he got his hands on. In 1812 he attended a series of chemistry lectures by Sir Humphry Davy at London's prestigious Royal Institution. He took copious and careful notes, and, in the hopes of landing a scientific job, bound them and sent them to the lecturer. Davy was impressed enough to hire the 21-year-old as a laboratory assistant. In his first decade at the Institution, Faraday discovered benzene, isobutylene, and two chlorides of carbon. But despite these and other accomplishments in chemistry, he is chiefly remembered for his work in physics. In 1831 he proved that magnetism could generate an electric current, thereby establishing the field of electromagnetism and leading to the invention of the dynamo. In addition to his extraordinary scientific activities, Faraday was a leader in his church, whose faith and wish to serve guided him throughout his career. An engaging public speaker, he gave popular lectures on scientific subjects, and helped found a tradition of scientific education for children and laypeople that continues to this day. Oxford Portraits in Science is an ongoing series of scientific biographies for young adults. Written by top scholars and writers, each biography examines the personality of its subject as well as the thought process leading to his or her discoveries. These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.
Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith
Posted By : Josaphat | Date : 05 Nov 2021 22:54 | Comments : 0

Colin A. Russell, "Michael Faraday: Physics and Faith"
Oxford University Press | ISBN: 0195117638 | November 29, 2021 | PDF | 124 pages | 7.7 MB

Michael Faraday (1791-1867), the son of a blacksmith, described his education as "little more than the rudiments of reading, writing, and arithmetic at a common day-school." Yet from such basics, he became one of the most prolific and wide-ranging experimental scientists who ever lived. As a bookbinder's apprentice with a voracious appetite for learning, he read every book he got his hands on. In 1812 he attended a series of chemistry lectures by Sir Humphry Davy at London's prestigious Royal Institution. He took copious and careful notes, and, in the hopes of landing a scientific job, bound them and sent them to the lecturer. Davy was impressed enough to hire the 21-year-old as a laboratory assistant. In his first decade at the Institution, Faraday discovered benzene, isobutylene, and two chlorides of carbon. But despite these and other accomplishments in chemistry, he is chiefly remembered for his work in physics. In 1831 he proved that magnetism could generate an electric current, thereby establishing the field of electromagnetism and leading to the invention of the dynamo. In addition to his extraordinary scientific activities, Faraday was a leader in his church, whose faith and wish to serve guided him throughout his career. An engaging public speaker, he gave popular lectures on scientific subjects, and helped found a tradition of scientific education for children and laypeople that continues to this day. Oxford Portraits in Science is an ongoing series of scientific biographies for young adults. Written by top scholars and writers, each biography examines the personality of its subject as well as the thought process leading to his or her discoveries. These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.
William Harvey and the Mechanics of the Heart
Posted By : Josaphat | Date : 05 Nov 2021 22:43 | Comments : 0

Jole Shackelford, "William Harvey and the Mechanics of the Heart"
Oxford University Press | ISBN: 0195120493 | September 8, 2021 | PDF | 144 pages | 9 MB

William Harvey is the riveting story of a seventeenth-century man of medicine and the scientific revolution he sparked with his amazing discoveries about blood circulation within the body. Jole Shackelford traces Harvey's life from his early days in Folkstone, England, to his study of medicine in Padua through his rise to court physician to King James I and King Charles I, where he had the opportunity to conduct his research in human biology and physiology. Harvey's lecture notes show that he believed in the role of the heart in circulation of blood through a closed system as early as 1615. Yet he waited 13 years, until 1628, to publish his findings, when he felt more secure at introducing a concept counter to beliefs that had been held for hundreds of years. A revealing look at the changing social, religious, and political beliefs of the time, William Harvey documents how one man's originality helped introduce a new way of conducting scientific experiments that we still use today.